Style Overview

The Four Behavioral Styles of DISC

There are four different behavioral styles which are measured in the DISC Assessment. The strength of each of them and the way in which the different styles combine define the way in which the person assessed like to carry out a task.  

The four styles and their dominant characteristics are:

D Dominance

The high D is ambitious, forceful, decisive, direct, independent and challenging. They are bottom-line organizers, self-starters and forward looking people who value time and are not content with the status quo. They are challenge-oriented, competitive, highly active, innovative, and tenacious. Stand back and let this person go.  

I Influence 

The high I is expressive, enthusiastic, friendly, demonstrative, talkative, and stimulating. They are optimistic, creative problem solvers who are motivated towards goals and verbalize articulately They are outgoing and empathetic, want to be liked and trusted and make great team players.

S Steadiness  

The high S is methodical, systematic, reliable, steady, relaxed and modest. They are loyal, dependable team players and work hard for the right leader. They are patient and empathetic, great listeners and logical, step-wise thinkers. They are calming and stabilizing and good at completing tasks. 

C Compliance

The high C is analytical, contemplative, exacting, careful, and deliberative. They maintain high standards and are objective thinkers who are conscientious, task oriented, diplomatic and detail oriented. They define, clarify, get information, criticize, test, pay attention to small details, and like to follow the rules. 

Emotions of Behavioral Styles:

The high D is impatient quick to anger.
The high I trusts people and is an optimist.
The high S is non-emotional. While they feel emotion they keep it within themselves.
The emotion of the high C is fear. They respect rules and go by the book.

In those areas where people have low scores, they will tend to have exactly the opposite tendencies. For example, the low D is slow to anger, and the low C doesn’t like rules.

Recognizing Behavioral Styles:

The high “D”  and the high “I” are extroverted.
The high “S” and high “C” are introverted.
The high “I” and the high “S” are people oriented,
The high “D” and the high “C” are task-oriented.

Understanding the Needs:

“D”: is looking for results.
“I” : is looking for the “experience”.
“S”: is looking for security.
“C”: is looking for information.
 

                                                                     

The Four Pillars of Behavior

  • Dominance

    The D is challenge-oriented, competitive, highly active, innovative, and tenacious. They are forceful, decisive, direct and independent - bottom-line driven self-starters who value time and are not content with the status quo.  

    The Time Edge

     

     

  • Influence

    The I is expressive, enthusiastic, friendly, demonstrative, and talkative. They are optimistic, creative problem solvers who verbalize articulately Outgoing and empathetic, they want to be liked and trusted and make great team players.

    The Time Edge

  • Steadiness

    The S is methodical, reliable, steady and modest. They are loyal, patient, dependable team players and work hard for the right leader. Calming and stabilizing, they are logical, step-wise thinkers who are good at completing tasks. 

    Edge Business Essentials

  • Compliance

    The C is analytical, exacting, careful, and deliberative. They maintain high standards and are , task oriented objective thinkers. They define, clarify, get information, criticize, test, pay attention to small details, and like to follow the rules. 

    The Alternative Board