Style Overview: D

DOMINANCE, DRIVE

General Characteristics:
Direct. Decisive. High Ego Strength. Problem Solver. Risk Taker. Self Starter

Value to Team:
Bottom-line organizer. Places value on time. Challenges the status quo. Innovative

Possible Weaknesses:
Oversteps authority. Argumentative attitude. Dislikes routine. Attempts too much at once.

Motivation and Greatest Fear:
New challenges. Power and authority to take risks and make decisions. Freedom from routine and mundane tasks. Changing environments in which to work and play. Greatest Fear: Being taken advantage of

Ideal Environment:
Innovative focus on future. Non-routine challenging tasks and activities. Projects that produce tangible results. Freedom from controls, supervision, and details. Personal evaluation based on results, not methods.  Authority, varied activities, prestige, freedom, assignments promoting growth, "bottom line" approach, and opportunity for advancement.

Do's and Don'ts of Communicating:

DO: Be brief, direct, and to the point. Ask "what" not "how" questions. Focus on business; remember they desire results. Suggest ways for him/her to achieve results, be in charge, and solve problems. Highlight logical benefits of featured ideas and approaches.

DON'T: Ramble. Repeat yourself. Focus on problems. Be too sociable. Make generalizations. Make statements without support.

While analyzing information, a High D may:
Ignore potential risks. Not weigh the pros and cons. Not consider others' opinions. Offer innovative and progressive systems and ideas.

The high D possesses these positive characteristics in teams:
Autocratic managers - great in crisis. Self-reliant. Innovative in getting results. Maintain focus on goals. Specific and direct. Overcome obstacles. Provide direction and leadership. Push group toward decisions. Willing to speak out. Generally optimistic. Welcome challenges without fear. Accept risks. See the big picture. Can handle multiple projects. Function well with heavy workloads.

Personal Growth Areas for the high D:
Strive to be an "active" listener. Be attentive to other team members' ideas until everyone reaches a consensus. Be less controlling and domineering. Develop a greater appreciation for the opinions, feelings, and desires of others. Put more energy into personal relationships. Show your support for other team members. Take time to explain the "whys" of your statements and proposals. Be friendlier and more approachable.

The Four Pillars of Behavior

  • Dominance

    The D is challenge-oriented, competitive, highly active, innovative, and tenacious. They are forceful, decisive, direct and independent - bottom-line driven self-starters who value time and are not content with the status quo.  

    The Time Edge

     

     

  • Influence

    The I is expressive, enthusiastic, friendly, demonstrative, and talkative. They are optimistic, creative problem solvers who verbalize articulately Outgoing and empathetic, they want to be liked and trusted and make great team players.

    The Time Edge

  • Steadiness

    The S is methodical, reliable, steady and modest. They are loyal, patient, dependable team players and work hard for the right leader. Calming and stabilizing, they are logical, step-wise thinkers who are good at completing tasks. 

    Edge Business Essentials

  • Compliance

    The C is analytical, exacting, careful, and deliberative. They maintain high standards and are , task oriented objective thinkers. They define, clarify, get information, criticize, test, pay attention to small details, and like to follow the rules. 

    The Alternative Board